What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
I’m drawn to the endless geometry, structure, and sometimes lack of order of the urban environment, and I think that’s where my ideas begin. I’ve studied landscape architecture and urban design, both of which seek to create order where there is chaos. I look at my painting in the same way. With a little sense of where I want to end up, I start to apply and scrape away paint to and from the canvas or wood board until something concrete materializes that I can build upon.

Join us inside the studio of Tim Hallinan.
Zoom Info
What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
I’m drawn to the endless geometry, structure, and sometimes lack of order of the urban environment, and I think that’s where my ideas begin. I’ve studied landscape architecture and urban design, both of which seek to create order where there is chaos. I look at my painting in the same way. With a little sense of where I want to end up, I start to apply and scrape away paint to and from the canvas or wood board until something concrete materializes that I can build upon.

Join us inside the studio of Tim Hallinan.
Zoom Info
What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
I’m drawn to the endless geometry, structure, and sometimes lack of order of the urban environment, and I think that’s where my ideas begin. I’ve studied landscape architecture and urban design, both of which seek to create order where there is chaos. I look at my painting in the same way. With a little sense of where I want to end up, I start to apply and scrape away paint to and from the canvas or wood board until something concrete materializes that I can build upon.

Join us inside the studio of Tim Hallinan.
Zoom Info
What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
I’m drawn to the endless geometry, structure, and sometimes lack of order of the urban environment, and I think that’s where my ideas begin. I’ve studied landscape architecture and urban design, both of which seek to create order where there is chaos. I look at my painting in the same way. With a little sense of where I want to end up, I start to apply and scrape away paint to and from the canvas or wood board until something concrete materializes that I can build upon.

Join us inside the studio of Tim Hallinan.
Zoom Info
What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
I’m drawn to the endless geometry, structure, and sometimes lack of order of the urban environment, and I think that’s where my ideas begin. I’ve studied landscape architecture and urban design, both of which seek to create order where there is chaos. I look at my painting in the same way. With a little sense of where I want to end up, I start to apply and scrape away paint to and from the canvas or wood board until something concrete materializes that I can build upon.

Join us inside the studio of Tim Hallinan.
Zoom Info
What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
I’m drawn to the endless geometry, structure, and sometimes lack of order of the urban environment, and I think that’s where my ideas begin. I’ve studied landscape architecture and urban design, both of which seek to create order where there is chaos. I look at my painting in the same way. With a little sense of where I want to end up, I start to apply and scrape away paint to and from the canvas or wood board until something concrete materializes that I can build upon.

Join us inside the studio of Tim Hallinan.
Zoom Info
What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
I’m drawn to the endless geometry, structure, and sometimes lack of order of the urban environment, and I think that’s where my ideas begin. I’ve studied landscape architecture and urban design, both of which seek to create order where there is chaos. I look at my painting in the same way. With a little sense of where I want to end up, I start to apply and scrape away paint to and from the canvas or wood board until something concrete materializes that I can build upon.

Join us inside the studio of Tim Hallinan.
Zoom Info

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
I’m drawn to the endless geometry, structure, and sometimes lack of order of the urban environment, and I think that’s where my ideas begin. I’ve studied landscape architecture and urban design, both of which seek to create order where there is chaos. I look at my painting in the same way. With a little sense of where I want to end up, I start to apply and scrape away paint to and from the canvas or wood board until something concrete materializes that I can build upon.

Join us inside the studio of Tim Hallinan.

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness.  According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.

Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel
Zoom Info
What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness.  According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.

Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel
Zoom Info
What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness.  According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.

Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel
Zoom Info
What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness.  According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.

Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel
Zoom Info
What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness.  According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.

Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel
Zoom Info
What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness.  According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.

Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel
Zoom Info

What are the major themes you pursue in your work?
My works focus on different elements of the concept of space. In terms of science-fiction literature, I try to instill an alternative reality, a “parallel universe” in which the components replace themselves harmoniously as they do in our universe. My works are my own science fiction. My compositions try to reveal the invisible rules and attachments of living creatures and non-living existences in time and space. Every element and object exists in space within these rules. I investigate these rules and apply them to my work’s surface in order to create large-scale spaces full of tiny forms inspired by the artwork of Anselm Kiefer. I explore the contrasts between nature and city, machine and human, organic and inorganic, and fulfillment and emptiness. According to art historian Heinrich Wolfflin, every movement evolves into its own Baroque some day. I feel like I am living the Baroque era of the 21st century’s abstract tradition. I am also influenced by the silence and dignity of early Renaissance and Byzantine painting.

Discover this week’s One-to-Watch, Gorkem Dikel